Record Details

Title Subsite specific colorectal cancer incidence rates and stage distributions among Asians/Pacific Islanders in the United States, 1995-1999
Author Wu, X
Secondary Authors Chen VW, Martin J, Roffers S, Groves FD, Correa CN, Hamilton-Byrd E, Jemal A
Publication Type (Help) article
Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Month Jul
Year 2004
Pages 1215-22
Volume 13
Number 7
Publisher
Address
Note
URL
PubMed ID 15247133
NCI Id
EPub Date
Citation Wu X, Chen VW, Martin J, Roffers S, Groves FD, Correa CN, Hamilton-Byrd E, Jemal A. Subsite specific colorectal cancer incidence rates and stage distributions among Asians/Pacific Islanders in the United States, 1995-1999. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004 Jul;13(7):1215-22. PMID 15247133.
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Abstract

This study examined subsite-specific colorectal cancer incidence rates and stage distributions for Asians and Pacific Islanders (API) and compared the API data with data for whites and African Americans. Data included 336,798 invasive colorectal cancer incident cases for 1995 to 1999 from 23 population-based central cancer registries, representing about two-thirds of the API population in the United States. Age-adjusted rates, using the 2000 U.S. standard population, and age-specific rates and stage distributions were computed by anatomic subsite, race, and gender. Age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence rates were significantly lower in API than in white and African-American populations, particularly for proximal colon cancer in which rates were 40% to 50% lower in API males and females. However, a significantly (10%) higher rectal cancer incidence rate was found in API males than in African-American males. Increases in age-specific rates with advancing age were more striking for proximal colon cancer than for distal colon and rectal cancers in white and African-American populations, while age-specific rates were similar for different subsites in API with parallel increases with advancing age, especially in API males. Similar to white and African-American persons, in API, proximal colon cancers (32% to 35%) were less likely to be diagnosed with localized stage compared with distal colon (38% to 42%) and rectal (44% to 52%) cancers. The patterns of subsite-specific colorectal cancer incidence in API, especially API males, differ from those of whites and African-American populations. Similar to white and African-Americans, a lower percentage of localized disease in API for proximal colon cancer than for distal colon and rectal cancers was observed.



Keywords

Keyword
asians/pacific islanders
cancer
colorectal
incidence
stage
subsite
united states