Record Details

Title The occurrence of rare cancers in U.S. adults, 1995-2004
Author Greenlee, RT
Secondary Authors Goodman MT, Lynch CF, Platz CE, Havener LA, Howe HL
Publication Type (Help) article
Journal Public Health Rep
Month Jan-Feb
Year 2010
Pages 28-43
Volume 125
Number 1
Publisher
Address
Note
URL http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2789814/
PubMed ID 20402194
NCI Id
EPub Date
Citation Greenlee RT, Goodman MT, Lynch CF, Platz CE, Havener LA, Howe HL. The occurrence of rare cancers in U.S. adults, 1995-2004. Public Health Rep. 2010 Jan-Feb;125(1):28-43. PMID 20402194. [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2789814/.]
  BibTex    


Abstract

Rare cancers have been traditionally understudied, reducing the progress of research and hindering decisions for patients, physicians, and policy makers. The descriptive epidemiology of rare cancers was evaluated using a large, representative, population-based dataset from cancer registries in the United States. More than 9 million adult cancers diagnosed from 1995 to 2004 in 39 states and two metropolitan areas were analyzed using the Cancer in North America (CINA) dataset, which covers approximately 80% of the U.S. population. The authors applied an accepted cancer classification scheme and a published definition of rare (i.e., fewer than 15 cases per 100,000 per year). Age-adjusted incidence rates and rare/non-rare incidence rate ratios were calculated using SEER*Stat software, with analyses stratified by gender, age, race/ethnicity, and histology. Sixty of 71 cancer types were rare, accounting for 25% of all adult tumors. Rare cancers occurred with greater relative frequency among those who were younger, nonwhite, and of Hispanic ethnicity than among their older, white, or non-Hispanic counterparts. Collectively, rare tumors account for a sizable portion of adult cancers, and disproportionately affect some demographic groups. Maturing population-based cancer surveillance data can be an important source for research on rare cancers, potentially leading to a greater understanding of these cancers and eventually to improved treatment, control, and prevention.



Keywords

Keyword
adults
cancer
rare
united states