Record Details

Title Association between breast cancer laterality and tumor location, United States, 1994-1998
Author Perkins, CI
Secondary Authors Hotes J, Kohler BA, Howe HL
Publication Type (Help) article
Journal Cancer Causes Control
Month Sep
Year 2004
Pages 637-45
Volume 15
Number 7
Publisher
Address
Note
URL
PubMed ID 15280621
NCI Id
EPub Date
Citation Perkins CI, Hotes J, Kohler BA, Howe HL. Association between breast cancer laterality and tumor location, United States, 1994-1998. Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Sep;15(7):637-45. PMID 15280621.
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Abstract

Cancer is more likely to be diagnosed in the left breast than the right, but the reasons for this are undetermined. Left-sided predominance has not been evaluated for some demographic groups or by tumor location. Laterality was analyzed among 419,935 incident unilateral breast cancers from 26 population-based cancer registries participating in NAACCR, covering 40% of the U.S. population. Logistic regression assessed the independent contribution of race, ethnicity, age, histology, stage, and location to laterality. Breast cancer was about 5% more likely to be diagnosed in the left breast than the right, a finding that was generally consistent across demographic groups and tumor types. Men showed left-sided predominance, which was statistically significant for invasive tumors and nonsignificant for in situ disease. Among women, tumors in the upper-outer quadrant, where one-third of cancers are located, occurred with equal frequency in the left and right breast, while those in the lower quadrants were about 10% more likely to occur in the left breast. The observation that the left breast is at greater risk of cancer than the right may not apply to tumors arising in the upper-outer quadrant. The identification of physiologic, pathologic, or immunologic differences between the lower, but not upper, left and right breasts may assist in explaining breast cancer laterality.



Keywords

Keyword
breast
cancer
laterality
tumor
united states